walking-on-earth:

The milky way. Sinai, Egypt.

Home.

walking-on-earth:

The milky way. Sinai, Egypt.

Home.

friendly-bibliophilie:

Tom O’Bedlam reads the second coming by William Butler Yeats

a-bittersweet-life:

Art by Film Directors presents a closer look into the artistic careers of many great filmmakers who began and continued their creative endeavors in art forms outside of cinema. Courtesy of Cinephilia and Beyond, film writer Karl French’s book offers a fascinating glimpse into the artworks of Alfred Hitchcock, Akira KurosawaJosef von Sternberg, and others who explored the limitless possibilities that art and imagination create. Master filmmakers are aware of the inspiration awaiting in sources outside of film, from personal experiences to paintings, photography, and more. Enjoy and be inspired with Art by Film Directors, When Film Imitates Art, and let the inspiration flow into your own artmaking!

This book looks at the meeting points between the cinema and other forms of visual art, and along the way highlights the surprising and illuminating connections and tensions between the different media. Born in the mid-1890s out of a marriage between technology and commerce, the cinema was and remains to a large extent a commercial, business-led medium. While other art forms may be involved with business, the impetus behind most—painting, photography, sculpture—is not inherently the need to attract as large a following as possible. Crudely put, while other visual arts are exclusive, films are inclusive. In fact cinema itself spans the range from, on the one extreme, elitist, consciously exclusive art to, at the other end, unashamed populism with little or no aspiration to art. The artist/directors featured within these pages themselves represent this full spectrum…

theparisreview:

“I won’t even talk to young writers anymore unless they can give me a good reason. I say, ‘I don’t have any time to talk to you unless you intend to give your entire life over to it, because it can’t be done otherwise.’”
In Esquire, Jim Harrison on what he has learned from writing.
Photograph: Michael Friberg.

theparisreview:

“I won’t even talk to young writers anymore unless they can give me a good reason. I say, ‘I don’t have any time to talk to you unless you intend to give your entire life over to it, because it can’t be done otherwise.’”

In Esquire, Jim Harrison on what he has learned from writing.

Photograph: Michael Friberg.

seven-minds:

A passion for something absent,

seven-minds:

A passion for something absent,

(Source: wjhk, via se7enhours)

norberthellacopter:

The Grand Budapest Hotel screenshots - cinematography by Robert D. Yeoman - 2013

Easily the best fucking film in the past two, three or even four years ! Kossomak still ya Wes Anderson..

(via ondaroof)

وداعا للغة

من اين ابدأ؟ كل الافكار مشوشة بعقلي و عند التقاطي لفكرة ما اجد صعوبة في ترجمتها لحروف و كلمات ليضيع مني الى الابد حبل الافكار هذا. دائما كنت احس ان اللغة بطبيعة الحال محدودة لايصال ما اود ايصاله من افكار و طلاسم بذهني. لا ادري اهو قصور مني؟ عدم استطاعتي عن التعبير عن الذات؟ او هل لذلك علاقة بطبيعة اللغة؟ عدم رغبتي في التواصل او في الكتابة –مؤخرا- جعلني افكر بهذا الامر..
لست على استعداد تام بالحديث مطولا محاولة لشرح ازمتي هذه، ربما ينم هذا عن حالة الامبالاة التي اعيشها. بالاضافة الى انني من الاشخاص الذين يملّون بسرعة و يتنقلون من فكرة لأخرى. اكره الركود. الجلوس في مكان واحد. التردد على نفس الاماكن. ها قد وصلت للمنتصف و لا ادري كيف اكمل. اضعت فكرتي الاساسية مجددا. من السهل التخبط خاصة عندما تكون شخصا حالما انطوائيا، تعيش في خيالك اغلب الوقت وارتباطك بالواقع شيئا بالغ التعقيد.. ابدأ في الحديث، او الكتابة بشغف و بلا سبب افقد الاهتمام في مرحلة ما  و انسحب.. في حالة من التوحد و الانغماس في الصمت المحيط.. فكرة التواصل في حد ذاتها مرهقة للنفس. اغلب الكلام الذي نتعاطاه و نتبادله ليس له معنى و اغلبه موجود لملئ الفراغات و حسب. ماذا ان كنت لا ارغب في لعب هذه اللعبة؟ أليس هناك طريقة أخرى للتعبير عن الذات سوى بالكلام؟ لا ادري.. كلها محاولات فاشلة. ربما على ان اشاهد فيلم جودار الجديد لربما يجيب على تساؤلاتي.

sentimentalist-the:

August 14, 1932 

Anais:

Don’t expect me to be sane anymore. Don’t let’s be sensible. It was a marriage at Louveciennes—you can’t dispute it. I came away with pieces of you sticking to me; I am walking about, swimming, in an ocean of blood, your Andalusian blood, distilled and poisonous….

You asserting yourself, getting the rich varied life you desire; and the more you assert yourself the more you want me, need me.”

cinephiliabeyond:

Andrei Tarkovsky and Anatoli Solonitsyn (in his book Sculpting In Time, Tarkovsky calls him his favorite actor) on the set of Andrei Rublev, 1966, plus some rare footage (in colour!) from the set of the film. Music by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich.

Underlying the concept of Andrei Rublev’s character is the schema of a return to the beginning; I hope this emerges in the film as the natural and organic progression of the ‘free’ flow of life created on the screen. For us the story of Rublev is really the story of a ‘taught’, or imposed concept, which burns up in the atmosphere of living reality to arise again from the ashes as a fresh and newly- discovered truth. —Tarkovsky talks film


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

Andrei Tarkovsky and Anatoli Solonitsyn (in his book Sculpting In Time, Tarkovsky calls him his favorite actor) on the set of Andrei Rublev, 1966, plus some rare footage (in colour!) from the set of the film. Music by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich.

Underlying the concept of Andrei Rublev’s character is the schema of a return to the beginning; I hope this emerges in the film as the natural and organic progression of the ‘free’ flow of life created on the screen. For us the story of Rublev is really the story of a ‘taught’, or imposed concept, which burns up in the atmosphere of living reality to arise again from the ashes as a fresh and newly- discovered truth. —Tarkovsky talks film

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

"There are other times, however, when this all does not matter and all you want to hear is someone else lying next to you, breathing, knowing so profoundly how weak you are; how much this rigid life has broken you, how small and unworthy you can be, how ordinary and terribly cowardly you are."

Yasmine (via yooo-gehn)