cinephiliabeyond:

Andrei Tarkovsky and Anatoli Solonitsyn (in his book Sculpting In Time, Tarkovsky calls him his favorite actor) on the set of Andrei Rublev, 1966, plus some rare footage (in colour!) from the set of the film. Music by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich.

Underlying the concept of Andrei Rublev’s character is the schema of a return to the beginning; I hope this emerges in the film as the natural and organic progression of the ‘free’ flow of life created on the screen. For us the story of Rublev is really the story of a ‘taught’, or imposed concept, which burns up in the atmosphere of living reality to arise again from the ashes as a fresh and newly- discovered truth. —Tarkovsky talks film


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cinephiliabeyond:

Andrei Tarkovsky and Anatoli Solonitsyn (in his book Sculpting In Time, Tarkovsky calls him his favorite actor) on the set of Andrei Rublev, 1966, plus some rare footage (in colour!) from the set of the film. Music by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich.

Underlying the concept of Andrei Rublev’s character is the schema of a return to the beginning; I hope this emerges in the film as the natural and organic progression of the ‘free’ flow of life created on the screen. For us the story of Rublev is really the story of a ‘taught’, or imposed concept, which burns up in the atmosphere of living reality to arise again from the ashes as a fresh and newly- discovered truth. —Tarkovsky talks film

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

"There are other times, however, when this all does not matter and all you want to hear is someone else lying next to you, breathing, knowing so profoundly how weak you are; how much this rigid life has broken you, how small and unworthy you can be, how ordinary and terribly cowardly you are."

Yasmine (via yooo-gehn)

thereisnoforgetting:

Pierre Jahan - Study for Plain Chant by Jean Cocteau, 1947

thereisnoforgetting:

Pierre Jahan - Study for Plain Chant by Jean Cocteau, 1947

(Source: sickpage, via postylaika)

"When you understand, that what you’re telling is just a story. It isn’t happening anymore. When you realize the story you’re telling is just words, when you can just crumble up and throw your past in the trashcan, then we’ll figure out who you’re going to be."

Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

cecilwuvscarlos.tumblr.com

(via psych-facts)

He remembers those vanished years. As though looking through a dusty window pane, the past is something he could see, but not touch. And everything he sees is blurred and indistinct. 

In The Mood For Love (2000)

(Source: chungkingexpress1994, via oldfilmsflicker)

"

too much too little

too fat
too thin
or nobody.

laughter or
tears

haters
lovers

strangers with faces like
the backs of
thumb tacks

armies running through
streets of blood
waving winebottles
bayoneting and fucking
virgins.

an old guy in a cheap room
with a photograph of M. Monroe.

there is a loneliness in this world so great
that you can see it in the slow movement of
the hands of a clock

people so tired
mutilated
either by love or no love.

people just are not good to each other
one on one.

the rich are not good to the rich
the poor are not good to the poor.

we are afraid.

our educational system tells us
that we can all be
big-ass winners

it hasn’t told us
about the gutters
or the suicides.

or the terror of one person
aching in one place
alone

untouched
unspoken to

watering a plant.

people are not good to each other.
people are not good to each other.
people are not good to each other.

I suppose they never will be.
I don’t ask them to be.

but sometimes I think about
it.

the beads will swing
the clouds will cloud
and the killer will behead the child
like taking a bite out of an ice cream cone.

too much
too little

too fat
too thin
or nobody

more haters than lovers.

people are not good to each other.
perhaps if they were
our deaths would not be so sad.

meanwhile I look at young girls
stems
flowers of chance.

there must be a way.

surely there must be a way that we have not yet
though of.

who put this brain inside of me?

it cries
it demands
it says that there is a chance.

it will not say
“no.”

"

The Crunch (from Love is a dog from hell) - Charles Bukowski [August 16, 1920 - March 9, 1994] (via friendly-bibliophilie)

"people are not good to each other.
people are not good to each other.
people are not good to each other.

I suppose they never will be.
I don’t ask them to be.”

cinephiliabeyond:

Gordon Willis, the legendary cinematographer behind such classic 1970s films as ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘Klute,’ ‘The Parallax View,’ ‘All the President’s Men’ and the ‘Godfather’ series, died on Sunday. He was 82.

“For a while, I really didn’t know what to do with that movie,” he said of the original ‘Godfather’ in a 2002 interview on NPR’s Fresh Air. “I finally decided this should have this brassy, yellow look to it. Don’t ask me why. It just felt right.” Francis Ford Coppola, a collaborator on three films, once said of Willis, “He has a natural sense of structure and beauty, not unlike a Renaissance artist.”

VIDEO ESSAY: In Memory of Gordon Willis (1931-2014) by Nelson Carvajal:

In the fall of 2006, Globe reporter Mark Feeney talked with Gordon Willis at his Falmouth home about his life and work. Here is a transcript of his conversation with the acclaimed cinematographer. It’s a brilliant interview, full of golden nuggets.


There’s a quote from the interview you did for the book ‘Principal Photography,’ “Most art, if you want to call film an art, comes out of craft.”
Yeah. I’ll expand on that. Somebody will say, “How did you do that?” Well, you know, it’s not really “how” you do something that’s important, it’s “why” you do it. It’s what you do and why you do it that’s important, I said; then how becomes part of the chain. “How” is your craft. It’s something you should know and learn and then, like paintbrushes, you pick up what you need to do what you do. But you can’t transpose an idea without your craft. The natural thing for someone to do, we all tend to reduce or expand things to a level that we understand. But what you’re doing is you’re avoiding your ability to function [laughs]. You can really function well if you reduce or expand. They may hire you for that. But the real meaning of it is — like the guy who doesn’t really know how to light so he keeps reducing things so he doesn’t have to light — “Let’s shoot it on the lawn.” So bottom line is: You do have to learn your craft. A lot of kids shoot movies, they don’t shoot the movie. They have no ideas. What they do is go out and shoot everything, put it together in film school, then they try to make a movie out of it. That goes on with people who should know better, who are making money.

Craft Track honour the work of Gordon Willis, “what’s unique about Mr. Willis is that just about everything he said was a golden nugget. The closer we looked, the more we learned — which Jeff wrote about in his post, One Morning with the Master: 5 Things I Learned from Gordon Willis. Here it is, everything we ever posted and learned from our time with Mr. Willis. You can also enjoy the complete unedited audio interview here or on our Through the Lens iTunes podcast.” The Collected Wisdom of the Late Gordon Willis

INTERVIEW PART 1:

INTERVIEW PART 2:

Also Recommended Reading:

What is narrative filmmaking to you?
Gordon Willis: Good storytelling. I always said that you could photograph a good story badly and it wouldn’t matter, but you can shoot a bad story well and it’s not going to help the story at all. It’s not. But you get the two together, and it’s great.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

wirespeed:

Daisy and Daisy get married

wirespeed:

Daisy and Daisy get married

ganzeerism:

image

On Friday, May 9th, a television show called “Al Raees Wel Nas” (The President and the People), hosted by TV personality Osama Kamal, accused me of being recruited by the Muslim Brotherhood. As you may already know, the Muslim Brotherhood has been officially designated as a terrorist…

بعد شهرين عاد ..
ركب مدخنة القطار وعاد .. وسيلته في العودة دائماً
الزمالك مأوى عمله، العجوزة مأوى الجسد .. هنا يتوه وهناك يتوه
قهوة السودانيين تستقبل شفتيه كل صباح بكوب الشاي..
يجلس فوق كوبه يراقب عجلات العجلة المذهولة، يراقب الأخبار المنصهرة وهى تندفع بلا دهشة عميقة في تنك بنزين الأتوبيس دون…